Synopsis

Andrei Tarkovsky’s unforgettably haunting film, his first to be made outside Russia, explores the melancholy of the expatriate through the film’s protagonist, Gorchakov, a Russian poet researching in Italy. Arriving at a Tuscan village spa with Eugenia, his beautiful Italian interpreter, Gorchakov is visited by memories of Russia and of his wife and children, and he encounters the local mystic who sets him a challenging task. Nostalgia is filled with a series of mysterious and extraordinary images, all of which coalesce into a miraculous whole in the film’s final shot. As in all Tarkovsky’s films, nature, the elements of fire and water, music, painting and poetry all play a major role.

Director

Andrei Tarkovsky
One of world’s most visionary, celebrated and influential filmmakers, Andrei Tarkovsky made just seven features before his tragically early death at the age of 54. Characterised by metaphysical and spiritual explorations of the human condition, each film is an artistic masterpiece of extraordinary visual beauty and stand as enduring classics of world cinema.

Details

Aspect ratio: 4:3 Colour: Colour Production year: 1983 Original title: Nostalghia DVD catalogue number: ART794DVD Blu-ray catalogue number: ART184BD Blu-ray special features: -Interview with co-writer Tonino Guerra -Interview with Marina Tarkovsky -Andrei Tarkovsky's Metaphysical Dream Zone: Selected scene commentary by Psychoanalyst Mary Wild -40-page booklet DVD special features: -40-page booklet

Awards

Winner of the 1983 Cannes Best Director award
Winner of the 1983 Cannes FIPRESCI Prize
Winner of the 1983 Cannes Prize of the Ecumenical Jury


Out now on DVD, Blu-ray & on demand

Also part of Andrei Tarkovsky Deluxe Collection

GENRE: Drama

CERTIFICATE: 15

DIRECTOR: Andrei Tarkovsky

DURATION: 120 Mins

COUNTRIES: Italy

LANGUAGES: Italian, Russian

AWARDS:
Winner of the 1983 Cannes Best Director award
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Reviews


  • “No one makes movies like this anymore... It's a mood piece that makes you feel like you’re drowning in high-grade art swill”

    Joshua Rothkopf, Time Out


  • “Perhaps Tarkovsky's most opaque film, Nostalghia is nonetheless one of his most personal”

    Kalvin Henely, Slant


  • “Hauntingly beautiful”

    David Parkinson, Empire

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